LetOhioVote.org v. Brunner

August 3, 2009: 1851 Center Files Amicus In Supreme Court Slots Case

The 1851 Center for Constitutional Law filed an amicus brief in LetOhioVote.org v. Brunner with the Ohio Supreme Court. This filing supports a public vote on video slot machines at Ohio horse race tracks. The 1851 Center filed on behalf of Ohio Citizen Action, Citizens in Charge and the Ohio Freedom Alliance. The amicus brief urges the court to find language in the state budget excluding the authorization of video slot machines from referendum unconstitutional.

“The referendum process outlined in the Ohio Constitution is sacrosanct and must be tread upon lightly,” said Maurice Thompson, director of the 1851 Center for Constitutional Law. “Ironically, in seeking to arbitrarily and unconstitutionally deprive the people of Ohio of their right to Referendum, the General Assembly accentuates the very reason why Initiative and Referendum are so vital to Ohio’s governance.”

The brief references that the right to referendum was added by amendment to the Ohio Constitution in 1912 to serve as a check on the General Assembly by permitting laws, or parts of laws passed in that body to be submitted to voters for their approval or rejection. In addition the brief shows that the Ohio Supreme Court has, on multiple occasions, upheld the right to a referendum as a staple of democracy in Ohio and should do so again on this issue.

September 21, 2009:Victory for 1851 Center and Let Ohio Vote

The Supreme Court of Ohio sided with LetOhioVote.org, 6-1, and LetOhioVote.org is currently gathering signatures. The Court’s decision can be viewed here.

 

July 31, 2009: 1851 Center’s Amicus Brief