•   September 14, 2011 - Ohio Supreme Court Protects Property Rights The court held that the State of Ohio extends to the natural shoreline, which is "the line at which the water usually stands when free from disturbing causes." The court reiterated its role as a protector of private property rights against state incursions and reminded the state that private property rights are expressly protected in the Ohio Constitution. October 1, 2010 - The Ohio AG’s Land-Grab on the Lake The 1851 Center filed an amicus brief in the Supreme Court of Ohio to stop Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray’s redefinition of property rights along Lake Erie. The AG and several left-wing environmental interest groups now claim that because the State of

  • 1851 Center Wins Injunction Against Andover Township Officials Who Blocked Constitution Day Rally (COLUMBUS) Wednesday a federal court granted the 1851 Center for Constitutional Law a temporary injunction against Andover Township in Ashtabula County. The ruling is a victory for Andover Township residents who were previously blocked by township officials from celebrating Constitutional Day (Sept. 17) with a rally at a public park.

  •   The First Amendment clearly protects the right to gather on the public square, speak out in support of limited constitutional government, and critique the current state of affairs. The government's action in this case, ironically, demonstrates the need for greater public understanding of Constitutional rights. One way to do that is through commemoration of Constitution Day. September 10, 2010 - 1851 Center Files Federal Court Action to Defend First Amendment Rights The 1851 Center for Constitutional Law today filed a complaint and temporary restraining order against Andover Township (Ashtabula County) in U.S. District Court in Cleveland. The complaint charges that township trustees' actions blocking a Constitution Day (Sept. 17) rally on Andover Public Square, by local residents, violated the

  • Back in March, Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray announced that Ohio would not be joining other state lawsuits against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the federal healthcare law) because the suits did not “have any legal merit whatsoever.” He based his decision, in part, on his expansive reading of the Commerce Clause.  

  • According to a March 2010 press release issued by Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray, our state will not be joining other state lawsuits against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the official name of the federal health care law) because the suits do not have “any legal merit whatsoever.”